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Diaphragmatic breathing after spinal cord injury

 Respiratory management / Diaphragmatic breathing spinal cord injury Air containing oxygen goes through nose and mouth to trachea. It then enters bronchi and then into the lungs. Lungs contain millions of air sacs called alveolar. From alveolar oxygen enters the blood stream from where it is supplied to the whole body. Carbon dioxide separate from blood at alveolar which is excreted out of the body. Breathing is a voluntary action controlled by a centre in the brain. During breathing messages from the brain travel to spinal cord and then to the breathing muscles which then move the air in and…

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Pressure sores information sheet

When a person sits or lay in bed for longer periods of time without moving or relieving pressure then the tiny vessels inside skin squeeze. As result flow of oxygen and important nutrients stop which results in death of skin cells of that area. An ulcer is formed and such kind of ulcer is known as pressure sores, bed sore, skin ulcer or decubitus ulcer. A person with limited mobility or impaired sensations is at high risk of developing skin sores. As both of these problems develop after spinal cord injury so the chances of bed sores are very high…

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